9 Actions Florida Should Take to Help Taxpayers Impacted by Hurricane Ian

1.     Postpone tax notices and waive penalties or interest for late tax filings in affected areas

2.     Extend the date for residents to take advantage of the tax discounts they would normally receive for paying property taxes and special assessments in November and postpone or defer the deadline for property tax installment payments

3.     Protect individual and business taxpayers from the risks for notices that they will likely not receive because their home or business addresses is not accessible anymore

4.     Issue no new audits in severely impacted areas, extend the statute of limitations and postpone existing audits that haven’t reached the assessment stage because these can’t be responded to while entire communities are still recovering

5.     Create procedures for fairly estimating taxes which can’t be calculated because records have been destroyed by the storm, moving away from the current method which significantly overestimates activity if no records are available

6.     Initiate procedures to offer payment plan assistance for late taxes, rather than resorting to the standard collection methods, like liens, levies, or bank freezes

7.     Retroactively apply the recently passed law that provides property tax refunds for residential property rendered uninhabitable as a result of a catastrophic event

8.     Provide tangible personal property relief and allow n on-residential properties rendered uninhabitable to receive property tax refunds

9.     Get Congress to pass a Disaster Tax Relief Act that includes provisions from past packages, including elements such as an Employee Retention Credit, an enhanced casualty loss deduction, and other relief provisions

Other Resources

Florida TaxWatch Statement on Hurricane Ian Recovery

Community Involvement

Addressing Florida's Escalating Physician Shortage: Strategies and Solutions

/ Categories: Research, Health Care, Releases

This paper addresses the growing issue of physician shortages in Florida. This shortage is primarily driven by an increasing and aging population, coupled with a high rate of physician retirements. The report evaluates the gap between healthcare demand and the supply of physicians, emphasizing the need for more medical students and improved healthcare policies. It discusses strategies like expanding Graduate Medical Education, utilizing telehealth, and leveraging Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to mitigate this shortage. The paper also considers legal and business aspects of practicing medicine in Florida, suggesting improvements to attract and retain healthcare professionals.


 

Florida Medicaid Redetermination

/ Categories: Research, Health Care

There are numerous federal programs administered by states that provide assistance to low-income and needy families. During periods of economic downturn, like the recent COVID-19 pandemic, more Florida families turn to these government programs for assistance. One such safety net program is Medicaid, the joint federal-state health insurance program that provides medical coverage to more than five million low-income, elderly, disabled Floridians and children. Signed into federal law in 1965, Medicaid was created to improve the health of those individuals who might otherwise go without medical care for themselves and their children.

Physician Shortages: Better Utilization of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in Palliative Medicine Could Provide Relief - Revised

/ Categories: Research, Health Care

A fast-growing and aging U.S. population is posing concerns for physicians’ ability to meet patient demand in the future. Current and future population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate a projected growth of 34.8 million people from 2019 to 2034. An estimated 66% of this growth is attributed to people aged 65 or older. As such, physician shortages are especially concerning in the hospice and palliative care sector. As the population ages, the need for a higher volume of care and more specialized expertise will grow.

Florida's Certificate of Need Program Delivers High Quality Hospice Care

/ Categories: Research, Health Care

The development of hospice programs in Florida is regulated by a Certificate of Need (CON) program. Certificate of Need programs allow the entry of new service providers if the local community has a demonstrated need. Florida is one of 13 states and the District of Columbia that continues to utilize a CON program for the development of hospice services. As Florida’s population increases and ages, it will become more critical to facilitate the growth of hospice services in the way that best serves hospice patients and protects the interests of Florida taxpayers.

Florida TaxWatch Briefing: Extending State Group Insurance to the Florida College System

Case Study: Indian River State College

/ Categories: Research, Taxes, Health Care, Insurance

Florida’s economy is strong. If Florida were a country, its gross domestic product (GDP) would rank 14th among economies worldwide, and its ambitions do not stop there. Florida aims to be within the top ten economies by 2030. By this time, two in three jobs are expected to require specialized training, a credential, or a degree. To achieve its economic goal, Florida will need to continue developing its specialized workforce. With 120,000 students completing Florida College System (FCS) programs each year, the FCS plays a critical role in providing the talent pipeline necessary to reach Florida’s economic goal and does so at a very affordable cost to students and Florida taxpayers alike.

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